Anison – Memory flashes
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Anison — Memory Flashes
Release date : Apr. 29, 2012
Label : Banquet Records

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Anison – Memory flashes

Anison deserve your time, attention and money
by SoundWorldReview

Memory Flashes is of the strongest, most confident débuts I’ve heard in years. One song after another is perfect single material, with catchy hooks and infectious choruses. The songs on this album keep reappearing in your head throughout the day, you’ll find yourself singing or tapping your foot as they fight for a place in the forefront of your mind.

It opens with a barnstorming first track. Repeat the Process is the album standout, the best example of their signature distorted guitars and harmonious vocals. Usually this kind of harsh contrast can be jarring; it takes a very delicate touch to get this kind of fragile balance right. Anison pull it off by not forcing the elements to work with each other, rather letting them circle each other suspiciously like two different creatures co existing in the same habitat forming an uneasy alliance leading to a Mexican stand-off of sound.

It’s rare a band allows each instrument its own sense of individuality and even rarer this kind of philosophy pays off, each musician performing very different roles yet coming together to form a cohesive unit. It shows a maturity beyond their years.

But that doesn’t mean that they are coughing up cobwebs and farting dust oh no, there is a youthful exuberance enlivening every track. Anison are a band self assured but never arrogant. The percussion constantly keeps an exciting pace below the foreground of every song making even the slowest moments urgent and electrifying; the energy is relentless but contagious, transferring it from the grooves of the vinyl to you, meaning that while the album never lets up neither do you listening to it.

Well it does let up once. The confusing forth track The Colour Red, not a bad song by any means just ordinary. At its position in the middle of the CD you get the feeling it was placed as a pacing device, a breather from the distortion and velocity. But rather it serves to demonstrate how important the heavy side of the band is, because without it they can become rather dull. It also has a rather messy ending in which the sounds have been cut and sliced as if it were recorded underneath a helicopter.

Fortunately The Mariachi arrives straight after to pick the pace back up and does so wonderfully. It lights a fire underneath the CD and gets it running again like a scalded dog. In doing so it reignites the bands passion for the album and your passion for the band.

Anison deserve your time, attention and money. And their music demands it.

Lee Hazell

 

Vulturehound